Oh, those Gorgeous Georgians!

For the Dress Like a Georgian Day Picnic I changed my mind three times. At first I was positive I would do something from the 1790s so that I could re-use it for a Regency event. Then I thought I would take a step back and work on a Chemise a la Reine but I decided to save that for my lecture at The British Museum.

After catching Marie Antoinette I decided to go for a completely new approach based on this dress:

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IMG_8625 Continue reading

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My dear, you are a confection of delight, a scrumptious macaron. Am I in love or am I suddenly ravenous for French pastries?

I don’t have time to make a proper post as I am in the middle of packing for a quick jaunt Stateside but I thought I would leave you with a  tantalizing glimpse of the gown I made for the Dress like a Georgian Day picnic in St. James’ Park.

May I present the four steps to creating a costume.

1) A bit of inspiration:

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2) Creating a colour palette:

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3) A bit of shopping:

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4)  Time to picnic and promenade!:

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Thank you to Aleksandra Ugelstad Elnæs for this lovely photo

Thank you to Aleksandra Ugelstad Elnæs for this lovely photo!

. . . to be continued

Don’t undertake a project unless it is manifestly important and nearly impossible. Edwin Land

I dont normally do this but seeing as I have now graduated University I thought it might be nice to put my upcoming projects in order!

I have a very exciting opportunity to work with a museum in July and I have been asked to wear a costume to the event. I promise in the days to come I will be able to discuss this in more detail but for now I will leave you with a hint of what is to come.

Chemise a la Reine: Louise Augusta. 1780, Jens Juel.

The second project is this lovely giacca from 1788.

c. 1788 Abiti del Passato

c. 1788 Abiti del Passato

 

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c. 1788 Abiti del Passato

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c. 1788 Abiti del Passato

And for the Jane Austen Festival in Bath I will be working on this spencer from 1790

c. 1790 Abiti del Passato

c. 1790 Abiti del Passato

 

“It is a truth universally acknowledged that a zombie in possession of brains must be in want of more brains.”

Last Monday I was sitting on a train staring out the window thinking about the upcoming week when my phone went off. A very talented friend had messaged me and mentioned he would be signing at the London MCM Expo | London Comic Con and after four years we should probably meet up to say Hi again!

As the train pulled out of Clapham Junction I sat there staring out the window like a zombie when I thought (out loud mind you) “OH! Hang on ZOMBIE!”

As in Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.

click here to continue the bloody tale . . .  Continue reading

The Genesee Regency Gown: Bright star, would I were steadfast as thou art . . .

When I was planning my gown for the Regency Society of Tennessee’s  tea I found a photo from the Greene Collection at the Genesee Country Village & Museum.  I fell in love and had to make it happen!

The museum website describes the gown as a  ” … dress, from the same time period (1815-1820) is also entirely hand stitched icy green plain weave silk. It has a very high waist and very long tubular sleeves which would have been worn slightly ruched on the arm. The skirt is in 3 panels and slightly gathered in front and pleated in the back.

It has a Vandyked neckline of little triangular tabs in the sleeve, forming a gorgeous cap effect which is accented with little white ribbon bows.

The stitching on this dress as well as the fact that it is made of silk indicates that this would have been considered a “good” dress and would have been worn for special occasions.”

The gown was made from a beautiful mint cotton swiss that I purchased from The Lace Cottage  where I take my heirloom sewing lessons and the little bows on the puffs are made of silk.  The triangles that line the neckline are individually folded vandyke points and were the most challenging part of the costume.

Based on extant gowns that I have been able to study I decided that the sleeves were most likely detachable sleeves.

I would also like to say thank you to Travellers Rest Plantation & Museum for graciously allowing me to take photos on their historic site.

A La Hérisson

Before I post pictures I would like to post a quick Here ye be warned:  Unless you have short hair, use a wig.  It took me two hours, 9 washes, an entire bottle of shampoo, and a small pair of scissors to loose what eventually wound up as five inches off the ends of my hair.  The hair comes at a price.

This is the look we were aiming for:

And this is how it turned out:

If you wonder how this hair came to be then read on. . . Continue reading