Oh, those Gorgeous Georgians!

For the Dress Like a Georgian Day Picnic I changed my mind three times. At first I was positive I would do something from the 1790s so that I could re-use it for a Regency event. Then I thought I would take a step back and work on a Chemise a la Reine but I decided to save that for my lecture at The British Museum.

After catching Marie Antoinette I decided to go for a completely new approach based on this dress:

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IMG_8625 Continue reading

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My dear, you are a confection of delight, a scrumptious macaron. Am I in love or am I suddenly ravenous for French pastries?

I don’t have time to make a proper post as I am in the middle of packing for a quick jaunt Stateside but I thought I would leave you with a  tantalizing glimpse of the gown I made for the Dress like a Georgian Day picnic in St. James’ Park.

May I present the four steps to creating a costume.

1) A bit of inspiration:

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2) Creating a colour palette:

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3) A bit of shopping:

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4)  Time to picnic and promenade!:

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Thank you to Aleksandra Ugelstad Elnæs for this lovely photo

Thank you to Aleksandra Ugelstad Elnæs for this lovely photo!

. . . to be continued

Don’t undertake a project unless it is manifestly important and nearly impossible. Edwin Land

I dont normally do this but seeing as I have now graduated University I thought it might be nice to put my upcoming projects in order!

I have a very exciting opportunity to work with a museum in July and I have been asked to wear a costume to the event. I promise in the days to come I will be able to discuss this in more detail but for now I will leave you with a hint of what is to come.

Chemise a la Reine: Louise Augusta. 1780, Jens Juel.

The second project is this lovely giacca from 1788.

c. 1788 Abiti del Passato

c. 1788 Abiti del Passato

 

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c. 1788 Abiti del Passato

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c. 1788 Abiti del Passato

And for the Jane Austen Festival in Bath I will be working on this spencer from 1790

c. 1790 Abiti del Passato

c. 1790 Abiti del Passato

 

“She was a remarkable, stunning beauty. Admired by Bernadotte, despised by Bonaparte. And no one could touch her”. Mme. Flamel

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I am preparing to embark upon a five day journey to the beautiful country of Malta for the Valleta Grand Ball. I am working on keeping my clothing very light and airy. In a coup de foudre, I have been struck with a love for another aspect of the early 19th century and I want to make sure my clothing reflects that. This gown is loosely inspired by Juliette Récamier, if not one of the most famous then certainly one of the most beautiful women in the art world.

I only have a few works in progress photos as this gown came together in a little under two days but at least this time I did remember to take photos for you!. Keeping with the period it is entirely hand stitched.

I came across this photo from the Madame Récamier collection displayed at the Musée Des Beaux-Arts De Lyon:

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The gown is described as being: ” . . . dress-shirt white cotton muslin, Train, short sleeves and square neckline. It dates from 1805: It’s called a half-set. This is the perfect outfit that Juliette Recamier to wear in the evening to sparkle in society (thank you Maryline!), or go to the ball, but this is not a Court gown. ” It was then followed by the closeup of the sleeves:

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The first thing I did was to use the techniques I learnt from my internship in Colonial Williamsburg to stitch up the side seams and to cartridge pleat the back.  Once that was complete I set about creating the basic bodice shape.

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I have been collecting entredeux for years as I am very fond of Heirloom sewing and I was so pleased to be able to put some of my collection to good use.

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The bodice went through various stages but I finally choose the second photo as my design.

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I prick stitched the pleats down so that they wouldn’t be completely flat.

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Here is the completed bodice!  The next step was the most tedious part of the entire gown. I timed myself to see how fast I could go and I was able to finish one entire sleeve in about 45 minutes.

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The last step was to remove the fabric from behind the insertion so it ends up looking a little like this:

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I’m currently inserting the sleeves but once that is complete I will share with you the final gown!

*Please note the title of this blog post has been taken from Mme. Flamel whose blog can be found here.